ELD. ELIJAH ROBISON KUYKENDALL

Grand Saline, Texas
Information transcribed from The Southland Vol. XII. No 1
Waco, Texas; Established March, 1892

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ELD. ELIJAH ROBISON KUYKENDALL
Grand Saline, Texas
Information transcribed from The Southland Vol. XII. No 1
Waco, Texas; Established March, 1892

Is one of the early settlers of the county. There are probably not more than three or four now living, who were here when he came in 1848. The family is of German extraction. On coming to America they first settled in North Carolina. Jesse was the grandfather and lived in North Carolina and came to Tennessee. Peter was the father's name and he was a Christian preacher and preached in an early day in Tennessee. He moved with his family to Van Zandt county in February, 1848. He settled about 5 miles southwest from the present town of Grand Saline, Elijah was born in Tennessee Dec. 14, 1836. The country was sparcely settled at that time. Peter S. Benton a tanner; J. D. Wright, a doctor; John Chrestman, a farmer; Joe Cox and Tom Cox, farmers and Allen Blair, constituted the settlement here. There was a settlement on McBee's Creek and Mr. McBee owned a mill the first in the county. It was what is known as a tread mill, but it ground all the meal for many miles around. The Shreveport and Dallas Road ran through the county from east to west and the Porter's Bluff road ran through the southern end of the county. These roads were traveled a great deal by imigrants (sic) stock drovers, adventurers, etc. There was a settlement then at the head of Saline Creek about 5 miles east from Canton, Yoes, Rawson, King and other lived there. Then in what is now the Edom community lived Uncle John Riles, John Cothern, Jack Horsely and his father. The Brutons and Harrisons lived on 4 mile Prairie. The country was more sickly than now and the seasons more irregular. The range was excellent. The mast in the bottoms and the grass on the up lands were fine. The creeks were all bordered with cane in great variety. Fat cattle fat hogs, fat horses were available winter and summer. Deer and turkey and prairie chickens were here in great abundance. Also there were bear, panther, wolves, catamounts and Mexican lions. The Indians had gona and the buffalo had retreated further west. There were some mustang ponies and a few wild cattle in the country. It was under conditions like these that young Elijah grew up. School advantages were limited. J. J. Kuykendall and older brother of our subject was the first teacher in the county, also the first deputy sheriff. Elijah's school advantages therefore were limited but he grew up a robust youth. Oct. 18, 1858, he married Nancy Ann Bratcher. She lived until July 20, 1881. January 21, 1882, he married Mrs. M. J. Smith who still survives. In 1862 he volunteered into the confederate service and served until the surrender, in Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas. He lost his health during the war and traveled several years afterward. He gained his health however and has been a remarkably strong man for his years since. He became a christian (sic) at the age of 12 and at the age of 50 entered the christian (sic) ministry. He is a mechanic. He owns his home in Grand Saline and has acquired some other property in the city. He labors with his hands and lives blamless (sic) before the people. He has a good record is a typical old Texan and furnishes a worthy example of Texas life.


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