JAMES ADDISON CLARK

Grand Saline, Texas
Information transcribed from The Southland Vol. XII. No 1
Waco, Texas; Established March, 1892

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JAMES ADDISON CLARK
Grand Saline, Texas
Information transcribed from The Southland Vol. XII. No 1
Waco, Texas; Established March, 1892

The Clarks are of Irish extraction. Mr. Clark's mother was of Scotch descent. The grandfather came to Virginia in an early day. The father moved to South Carolina. He married there to Miss Mary Rosmand. They moved to Georgia where he died and the widow moved later to Alabama and yet later to Van Zandt county where she died in 1872. James was born in South Carolina April 20, 1830. His parents were slave holders and he was reared under the old regime. The antebellum conditions with negroes (sic) to do everything and white children to be lords and ladies prevailed - however, Mr. Clark's father taught him to work. His education was received in Alabama but in 1851 he moved to Texas - Freestone county. In 1860 he came to Van Zandt near Owlet Green. He says it was the most complete paradise there, do underbrush, the large timber beautiful in farm and size the country open and grass half side deep to the cattle and horses, game abundant and the streams filled with fish. In 1862 he joined the army in 1893 his health failed and he hired a substitute as a soldier and was elected sheriff of the county. Under reconstruction he was removed from office in the political caldron. He had however, tired of public office and moved to his farm, where he lived in quietude. He has seen the wilderness blossom as the rose and thinks no country is superior to Van Zandt on his farm he has frequently made one and a half bales of cotton to the acre and fifty bushels of corn per acre, also 20 bushels of wheat. He says the land is adopted to oats, Barley, Rye and vegetables, galore. There is probably no better fruit country in the world. Mr. Clark has seen the growing development and thinks a very bright future awaits the county. He went 25 miles to mill and had to go as far for a doctor and all else was in proportion shrive part was the market and flour was worth $20 a barrel. The conditions have been changing all the while and he thinks great things await us than we have ever known.


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